Peter Gizzi

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Archive for November, 2016

Threshold Songs

Posted on: November 16th, 2016 by pgAdmin

These poems perform at the interior thresholds encountered each day, where we negotiate the proximities of knowing and not knowing, the gulf of seeing and feeling, the uncanny relation of grief to joy, and the borderless nature of selfhood and tradition. At once conceptual and haunted, these poems explore the asymmetries of the body’s chemistry and its effects on expression and form.

History Is Made at Night

Posted on: November 16th, 2016 by pgAdmin

Pinocchio’s Gnosis

Posted on: November 16th, 2016 by pgAdmin

The 8

Posted on: November 16th, 2016 by pgAdmin

A 10-minute poem-film in collaboration with Natalia Almada. In Arabic, French, and English. Produced by Tamaas, Paris. 2010

Screenings: Cinematheque Tangier, Tangier; Centre Pompidou, Le Rencontres Internationales Paris; 2010 Berlin Film Festival, Germany; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Le Rencontres Internationales Madrid; Cinema South Festival, Israel; Sète Film Festival, France; ZEBRA Poetry Film Festival, Germany; Dallas VideoFest, Texas; Festival Internacional de Cine de Morelia, Mexico; Lyrikertreffen, Münste; NYU Paris; Tate Modern, London.

In Song & Story

Posted on: November 16th, 2016 by pgAdmin

Song Out of Mind

Posted on: November 16th, 2016 by pgAdmin

Homer’s Anger

Posted on: November 16th, 2016 by pgAdmin

Five editions w artwork by Jane Hammond, USA; Jacob Dahlgren, Sweden; Terresa Serano, Mexico; Daniel Dezeuze, France; Srishti Bajaj; India

Airs de Saisons

Posted on: November 16th, 2016 by pgAdmin

Trans. into French by Olivier Brossard et al.

Quatre pour Claude

Posted on: November 16th, 2016 by pgAdmin

Trans. into French by Éric Pesty

The Outernationale

Posted on: November 16th, 2016 by pgAdmin

The Outernationale locates us “just of the grid,” in an emotional and spiritual frontier, where reverie, outrage, history, and vision merge. Thinking and feeling become one in the urgent music of Peter Gizzi’s poems. Saturated with luminous detail, these original poems possess, even in their sorrowing moments, a dizzying freedom. Objects, images, and their histories are caught here in their half-life, their profoundly human after-life. Gizzi has written a brilliant follow-up to Some Values of Landscape and Weather, a work hailed by Robert Creeley as “a breakthrough book in every way: for reader, for writer, and for the art.”